I'm pretty new to clothing design and while I can get my head around the design and business sides of it with no issues the whole printing side I find really confusing.
I know about basic silk screen printing, that's simple enough, but a lot of the designs I plan to use are painted by hand and I would prefer it to stay looking like that as much as possible. I understand that screen printing wouldn't be a suitable process for this so how would I go about printing a detailed painting onto a t-shirt with the best quality.
This is probably common knowledge but I find most websites are very convoluted and sporadic in their explanation of what kind of art need what process, and what process needs which sort of fabric etc...

Any help would be much appreciated!

Here is an example of the kind of art style I'm looking at. (Note: This is NOT my art, it's by Abby Diamond @finchfight)
  • Craig Robson

    something like that MIGHT be suited to a screen print depending on how awesome your printer is, theres a black and a few greens, its good that the palette is limited.

    alternatively you could look into DTG printing (direct to garment) through someone like Jackprints, or look at your options for a four color (cmyk) process print if there are more colors than the example above.
  • closetnerd

    Craig Robson said:something like that MIGHT be suited to a screen print depending on how awesome your printer is, theres a black and a few greens, its good that the palette is limited.

    alternatively you could look into DTG printing (direct to garment) through someone like Jackprints, or look at your options for a four color (cmyk) process print if there are more colors than the example above.

    I figured DTG would be the only way, but I guess not. I can't wrap my head around making things like gradients and watercolor screen print-ready either. Would you make them halftones?
  • Reap And Relive

    Oh yeah I vaguely remember hearing something about DTG. I guess if I send the printer some examples of the style I want I can just find out if they can do it? I plan to commission art so my issue was that I didn't want to pay for a piece that can't be printed.

    Is DTG good quality? Like, it's not going to just wash out or fade after a short amount of time? I'm spending ALOT on the best quality garments I can find so it would be a shame if the quality of the print doesn't live up to the garments or branding.

    Cheers for the help guys!
  • Reap And Relive

    Also, can you print DTG onto 100% cotton? I can't find anything that explains this.
  • davidSEIBEI

    I work in the art department of a screen printer (Forward Printing in Oakland, CA) and do separation work; this would be no problem to screen print. On a white tee I'd probably try to run this as 4 or 5 colors (I'd wanna actually start doing the separation to be sure).

    DTG can do this, too, but if you can meet a screen printer's minimums (typically something like 36-48 pieces, depending), screen printing is better and more affordable on actual production runs. If you're looking to just get a few done, DTG is the way to go. I don't know DTG nearly as well as I know screen printing, but from what I've heard it doesn't hold up quite as well in the wash.

    If you'd like to talk to me about having this printed, dmurray@forwardprinting.com is my work email.
  • Pushthatbolder

    all i can say is, dye sublimation, or Jak Prints Full shirt prints
  • Reap And Relive

    Cheers david, I'll give you a shout if I've got any more questions :)
  • Derisory Designs

    This is definitely screen printable. Any color separator worth their salt could could do this in 4 colors tops. (5 if they want to bring out a bit more depth with some of the grey undertones and 3 if they wanted to get super creative and combine the blue and yellow layers to form the green.) Color separation on a job like this is the hardest part. All the printer has to worry about is registering the screens and make sure they are using the right, tight mesh.
  • Bedlam77

    Some of these super knowledgeable printers can verify this but using a clear plastisol base just lightly tinted would give you the transparent look that you get with water color paints
  • lazyeye

    Pushthatbolder said:all i can say is, dye sublimation, or Jak Prints Full shirt prints

    Dye sublimation needs some sort of polyester to be in the fabric. That's my biggest beef with them. Some of the blends are really not too bad tho.
  • Elynn

    So we had to go to a seminar and had to get shirts printed with myassignmentwriting on them. I chose a vendor closest to me and he delivered all of the shirts within one hour.
  • Hashtagme

    Check out new designs
    Hashtagme
  • Cydney

    If you are facing any doubts about the pdf merging softwares then go to https://altomergepdf.com/faq. It has a list of frequently asked questions so that you can find answers.
  • Cydney

    The work I found on www.fotobabble.com/m/QU1hTlk3VVA4RUE9 is truly amazing. The article is well written and for me it's inspiring. I admire the writer's effort with all of my heart.

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