Im having a hard time deciding which one would be the best choice between these two :

http://www.jiffyshirts.com/gildan-G800.html

http://www.jiffyshirts.com/jerzees-29M.html
  • 404-Studio

    I prefer Gildan. No reason, simply a preference.
  • mrgalati

    Gildan is the #1 brand in the imprinted apparel industry (at least as far as volume). Get a resale license and you can get better prices from a number of wholesalers - jiffyshirts.com is basically a reseller.
  • MrLuna

    Oh ok, i just dont want to buy the wrong shirt style, i dont want the sleeves to be flying out or the shirts to be too short

    Im only starting out, i dont really think i need a resale license
  • Joedaddy

    Gildan sucks. If you are slightly taller than the average size they are belly shirts.
  • MrLuna

    Thats what i dont want.

    anybody know some good shirts that can be bought at wholesale without a resale license?
  • MrLuna

  • Involuntary

    Gildan isn't my fav.
    Like the Soft style though.

    It all depends what fit you want.

    If you want a "fashion fit"
    you should look at Anvil, Tultex or Jerzees.
    Most of these shirts are a bit longer than the Gildan shirts.
  • MrLuna

    I just dont want the shirt to be too short, and the sleeves/arms to be flying out like wings. I also dont want the shirt to be too fit to where it looks like a girls shirt.

    But im probably going to order 1 of each to see which one is better personally, rather than through the cheesy pictures they have on the website
  • Obscure

    Im really liking B&C at the moment thinking about doing my next release on them.
  • Involuntary

    Seems like you have a good one on Gildan Soft Style.
    It's longer than the standard, has slightly a slimmer fit,
    sleeves are a bit thighter.

    Obscure, what model are you going for?
  • MrLuna

    Hey Involuntary, Take a look at the ones im looking at,
    http://www.jiffyshirts.com/cart/

    which one fits this style :
    tumblr_lmny3kqebd1qcf4k5o1_500
  • primo

    MrLuna said:Hey Involuntary, Take a look at the ones im looking at,
    http://www.jiffyshirts.com/cart/

    which one fits this style :
    tumblr_lmny3kqebd1qcf4k5o1_500

    If you're serious about creating a streetwear brand, do some independent research, get samples, and figure out you're own style instead of posting pictures from hypebeast and attempting to imitate other brands.
  • MrLuna

    I'm already going to get samples, i just want to save some time and see if anyone knows what are some quality fitting shirts from the ones i posted that are similar to that shirt.

    Honestly i dont even like that hypebeast brand, and im not looking to imitate them. I dont think they're the only ones using that kind of shirt style. I just happened to be browsing the internet and finding that shirt style randomly.
  • mrgalati

    There are a couple different "types" of tees in the wholesale apparel industry that are used in indie brands:

    Traditional cut/fit -
    Examples: Gildan 2000, 5000, 8000 / Anvil 779, 979
    These are standard sized, "boxy" cut, with traditionally knit jersey cotton. These range from 5.5oz to 6oz and are usually 100% cotton (except the G8000 from the above examples).
    You probably already own a bunch of this type of t-shirt - typically "promotional" t-shirts are printed on these styles. You'll find them all over in retail, especially sporting goods stores and big box stores (Wal-Mart, etc)

    Fashion fit -
    Examples: American Apparel 2001, Tultex 0202TC, Anvil 980, Gildan 64000
    These have a more slim fit cut - usually targeted at a younger demographic. These are usually in the 4-4.5oz range and usually ringspun cotton - basically, thinner, softer, and preferred by screen printers. They also tend to be more expensive than the traditional styles. These often also have tear away tags for easy relabeling.
    Most of the brands that you'll find on this site sell their designs on this type of shirt. They're also found in the retail world (Hot Topic, etc) and in band merchandise.

    There are obviously many other brands/styles that I didn't mention above - those just tend to be the ones that I'm most familiar with.
  • MrLuna

    Wow thanks mrgalati, ill be using this info when it comes to ordering my shirts.

    For the Gildan models, would the Gildan 5000 be the same as the Gildan G500 or are they just different?
    They both pop up when i search for the 5000

    How can i contact you in case i have more questions?
  • mrgalati

    Yes, the Gildan 5000 and G500 are the same thing. Some wholesalers have simplified it for their own systems.

    You can contact me on twitter - @tsc_florida or at mgalati@tscapparel.com
  • MrLuna

    Alright got it, got a more clear view of what i'm looking for thanks haha.
  • Obscure

    Gildan ultra navy blue is my favourite fitting tee.

    Getting really sick of gildan soft mixing old and new stock so the collars and feel of tee varies all the time!
  • Obscure

    Involuntary said:Seems like you have a good one on Gildan Soft Style.
    It's longer than the standard, has slightly a slimmer fit,
    sleeves are a bit thighter.

    Obscure, what model are you going for?

    Oh sorry missed that. Using the exact 150's.
  • Chris Austin

    Obscure said:Gildan ultra navy blue is my favourite fitting tee.

    Getting really sick of gildan soft mixing old and new stock so the collars and feel of tee varies all the time!

    The new Gildan soft style tee's are awesome, the old ones go out of shape and horrible. Most streetwear brands use Gildan heavy/ultra to my knowledge unless they go cut & sew.
  • RRAL

    My 2 cents:

    Gildan - avoid: they are #1 because they sell the cheapest shirts that every corner screen print shop uses to do family reunion / high school band / promo shirts, where no one is thinking about quality, just price.

    American Apparel - avoid: Don't build your brand using a blank (product) that is likely to go out of business in the next year. Not only are they over rates and over priced, their competition is getting stiff and they have a lot of legal problems because the ceo/founder has several sexual assault charges against him.

    Hines (Nano) - avoid: I like the Beefy T alot, one of the best shirts on the market in my opinion. But if you are looking for the lighter weight / fashion cut their Nano shirt is nice until in shrinks a ton and the print you had on the chest is not up on the neck. Also Hanes' black tend to have a faded or reddish cast to them.

    I like the Anvil Fashion Fit t-shirt: about half the cost of an AA, the blacks are decent, nice and soft, they don't shrink much and the tag is removable. I also like the Anvil 50/50 recycled cotton shirt they have some cool heather colors, feel great... but a tad bit more expensive.

    I order from Alpha Shirt... good company, will need to get and EIN number (pretty easy to do via the IRS website). If you can order $500 or more from them a month let them know and they will give you a better discount on your orders.

    The Tulex look good, I haven't found a decent supplier for them. Anyone have a suggestion? Maybe that's a good topic for another thread.
  • SQWEAR

    mrgalati said:There are a couple different "types" of tees in the wholesale apparel industry that are used in indie brands:

    Traditional cut/fit -
    Examples: Gildan 2000, 5000, 8000 / Anvil 779, 979
    These are standard sized, "boxy" cut, with traditionally knit jersey cotton. These range from 5.5oz to 6oz and are usually 100% cotton (except the G8000 from the above examples).
    You probably already own a bunch of this type of t-shirt - typically "promotional" t-shirts are printed on these styles. You'll find them all over in retail, especially sporting goods stores and big box stores (Wal-Mart, etc)

    Fashion fit -
    Examples: American Apparel 2001, Tultex 0202TC, Anvil 980, Gildan 64000
    These have a more slim fit cut - usually targeted at a younger demographic. These are usually in the 4-4.5oz range and usually ringspun cotton - basically, thinner, softer, and preferred by screen printers. They also tend to be more expensive than the traditional styles. These often also have tear away tags for easy relabeling.
    Most of the brands that you'll find on this site sell their designs on this type of shirt. They're also found in the retail world (Hot Topic, etc) and in band merchandise.

    There are obviously many other brands/styles that I didn't mention above - those just tend to be the ones that I'm most familiar with.

    Awesome info!!!, just wondering when topics like this come up. How come no one ever throws Alstyle (AAA) into the mix? Do their shirts suck?
  • mrgalati

    The Tulex look good, I haven't found a decent supplier for them. Anyone have a suggestion? Maybe that's a good topic for another thread.

    Exclusively available from TSC Apparel - http://www.tscapparel.com / http://www.tultex.net (or for you Europeans, http://www.tultexusa.com )

    American Apparel - avoid: Don't build your brand using a blank (product) that is likely to go out of business in the next year. Not only are they over rates and over priced, their competition is getting stiff and they have a lot of legal problems because the ceo/founder has several sexual assault charges against him.

    Although I don't work for AA, I do work for the largest distributor of American Apparel products, and when I see comments like this, I wish that people would stop perpetuating rumors/myths. Check this for an update on AA's status...they're going to be just fine:

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/money_co/2011/08/american-apparel-releases-updated-second-quarter-results.html
  • mrgalati

    Awesome info!!!, just wondering when topics like this come up. How come no one ever throws Alstyle (AAA) into the mix? Do their shirts suck?

    I see Alstyle mentioned all the time on this site. Reputable brand with solid products, from what I hear, but since they're one of my competitors, I typically won't be recommending them. :) All due respect, though.
  • SQWEAR

    mrgalati said:
    Awesome info!!!, just wondering when topics like this come up. How come no one ever throws Alstyle (AAA) into the mix? Do their shirts suck?

    I see Alstyle mentioned all the time on this site. Reputable brand with solid products, from what I hear, but since they're one of my competitors, I typically won't be recommending them. :) All due respect, though.

    right on man, understood. May I ask where do you work? I may want to get pricing info from you. I am still deciding on some shirts (Despite the fact I picked up a pallet of AAA's for dirt cheap).
  • Tony A

    Obscure said:Im really liking B&C at the moment thinking about doing my next release on them.

    Really ? my samples are shorter than Gildans.
  • mrgalati

    May I ask where do you work? I may want to get pricing info from you. I am still deciding on some shirts (Despite the fact I picked up a pallet of AAA's for dirt cheap).

    Sure thing - hit me up, my contact info is a few posts up. I work in FL, but I can definitely put you in touch with someone on the west coast that can help you out.
  • Obscure

    Tony A said:
    Obscure said:Im really liking B&C at the moment thinking about doing my next release on them.

    Really ? my samples are shorter than Gildans.

    After looking closer to B&C today after folding 1000 of them i notice a few of them are inconsistent too..... Might stick to Ultra then as i havn't had any problems with them at all.
  • RRAL

    I know financial writers have to look at trends and may not have all the facts, but on the other hand they don't have a monetary interest in making sure apparel lines continue to buy the product as say the largest AA wholesaler would. As far as the lawsuit its hard to say they are lies or myths, but I guess as long as they don't use sweatshops it’s ok.

    This is what I read in the wall street journal around 6/23...
    4. American Apparel
    The once-hip retailer reached the brink of bankruptcy earlier this year, and there is no indication that it has gained anything more than a little time with its latest financing. It currently trades as a penny stock. The company had three stores and $82 million in revenue in 2003. Those numbers reached 260 stores and $545 million in 2008. For the first quarter of this year, the retailer had net sales for the quarter of $116.1 million, a 4.7% decline over sales of $121.8 million in the same period a year ago. Comparable store sales declined 8% on a constant currency basis. American Apparel posted a net loss for the period of $21 million. Comparable store sales have flattened, which means the firm likely will continue to post losses. American Apparel is also almost certainly under gross margin pressure because of the rise in cotton prices. The retailer raised $14.9 million in April by selling shares at a discount of 43% to a group of private investors led by Canadian financier Michael Serruya and Delavaco Capital. According to Reuters, the 15.8 million shares sold represented 20.3 percent of the company's outstanding stock on March 31. That sum is not nearly enough to keep American Apparel from going the way of Borders. It is a small, under-funded player in a market with very large competitors with healthy balance sheets. It does not help matters that the company's founder and CEO, Dov Charney, has been a defendant in several lawsuits filed by former employees alleging sexual harassment.

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