Chd queries the inside out distressing.



Now, I'm not a fancy big city engineer, but have never heard of structures, let alone paint/ink, corroding from the inside out. Does anyone know where this style get it's roots?

I know there is a style for screen printed posters which is close, that one is based on lazy/broke screen printers rationing out inks. This style just seem to be without logic.





*disclaimer: I am not picking on this style of distressing. I kind of like it, I just like my shirts to be logically sound.

*disclaimer numero dos!: I am not picking on these shirts, I just thought these looked cool and best exemplified this distress style.
  • DanielAndHisArt

    i blame dribbble for all current trends involving texture.

    also, all the tutorials these kids are following are the same, so that is probably why they all look the same.

    halftone texture, apply it to text, erase texture around text, merge layers, add inner stroke, etc.
  • Serji Gold

    Good question and I think I've got the answer.

    The effect that you see being imitated and reinterpreted so much these days derives from rubber ink stamps. Here are some examples:






    I'm guessing that when uneven force is applied, with lack of ink in the middle, you get that result.

    Correct me if I'm wrong though.
  • Anthony Smith

    Totally agree. It seems alot of people use textures/distressing as a quick fix to make an unfinished design look finished (definitely not referring to the examples above, just an observation).

    Unfortunately for them it stands out like a sore thumb.
  • HMPHRY

    I would like to give Serji a +1, however he is Canadian, and I do not know my imperial-to-metric unit conversions! So, pat on the back!
  • Make Believe

    People in the design and apparel industry have used the texture technique forever. If done correctly it should give the design a worn / vintage look to it. Similar to a plastisol or water base printed tee you've worn and washed 100+ times.

    As far as the eroding from the inside out. If you look at an old tee from the 70's or 80's you'll see where the ink is washing away like this :



    Here is an example of a distressed tee I did for Upper Playground to give a similar effect :



    There was a company called Mister Retro that came out with Washing Machine textures a few years back. That was when I started seeing it pop up a lot more often. http://www.misterretro.com/machine_wash_deluxe_filters.html

    Its definitely become a "trendy" thing to do lately..
  • RobotTiger

    Make Believe said:People in the design and apparel industry have used the texture technique forever. If done correctly it should give the design a worn / vintage look to it. Similar to a plastisol printed tee you've worn and washed 100+ times.

    As far as the eroding from the inside out. If you look at an old tee from the 70's or 80's you'll see where the ink is washing away like this :



    Here is an example of a distressed tee I did for Upper Playground that obviously isn't from the 70's or 80's :



    There was a company called Mister Retro that came out with Washing Machine textures a few years back. That was when I started seeing it pop up a lot more often. http://www.misterretro.com/machine_wash_deluxe_filters.html

    CLIENT ENVY
  • Serji Gold

    HMPHRY said:I would like to give Serji a +1, however he is Canadian, and I do not know my imperial-to-metric unit conversions! So, pat on the back!

    Haha, thanks.

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